Tuesday, September 25, 2007

In the Shearing Shed



Well I spent the morning in the shearing shed this morning. The above photo isn't actually our shed but gives you an idea. DH wanted to take a photo of me with a fleece for the blog but I vehemently declined. :-) It wasn't our main shearing, just a half a day he and a neighbour were doing so I was just helping skirt fleeces (pull all the yukky bits off from around the edges) and sweep the board.

You'd think having been a farmer's wife for over 11 years now, that being in the shearing shed wouldn't be all that unusual for me. But it is. I'm definitely NOT a "boots and all" farmer's wife. As my DH puts it, I'm not a "farmer's wife", I'm simply married to a farmer. I'm still pretty "citified" when it comes to all things "farm". :-) I do usually cook for the shearer's but I don't work in the shed.

Of course, my DH has a very good reason for insisting that I'm not a "farmer's wife". The very first time we met, in general conversation, I happened to mention to him that I had no intention of ever becoming a farmer's wife. The very thought horrified me. Not that I really had an understanding of farming life as it is today. Other than the distances between houses and a lack of traffic, our lifestyle doesn't vary that much from anyone else's.

I have to admit, I quite enjoyed it. It did help that the guys threw their own fleeces onto the table for me. Otherwise I might not be able to even type this blog post right now. I'd need to build a lot more upper arm strength to be able to throw fleece after fleece. It's interesting though. You have to pick it up by certain parts in order to get a decent throw (I did attempt one) and have everything spread out on the table where you need it.

I think there is definitely something "simple living" about skirting a fleece. There's something about working closely with natural fibres that appeals to me. I really enjoyed the pace (which admittedly was slower than it would have been with our regular shearers). And I was able to just let my mind wander as I pulled apart pieces of wool and sorted it into different sections of the shed. Plus I've given my hands a very natural moisturising treatment. :-)

So I learnt something new today. And I think I'll add it to my "101 things I thought I'd never do" list. Perhaps I should post that list so I can keep a track of where I'm up to. LOL.

12 comments:

emma.jean said...

Hi Jodi,

I once wanted to be a roustabout... Have you thought about getting a spinning wheel?

Emma.

Ali said...

that's something to definately add to the 101 things list!!

Anonymous said...

Your blog makes me feel homesick for the amazing unique smell and feel of a fleece! At my uncles funeral they had a fleece on display at the front of the hall along with medals and other Jack things and I took a bit home with me as well as a pocket full of wheat! I felt like a real little kid! So glad it was therapeutic for you too. Isn't lanolin something on your hands? LS

lightening said...

LOL Emma - no can't say as I have thought about getting a spinning wheel. It's a scary thought actually. I NEVER thought I'd take up knitting so a spinning wheel is probably not out of the question. In fact, I think my dad owns one. Spinning is supposed to be very good for your blood pressure (ie calming).

LS - sheep STINK!!! LOL. Is it possible to be homesick for that smell? But you do kind of get used to it I suppose. I don't mind DH giving me a massage after he's been doing a week of shearing - very good for his hands. Can't say the same about his fertiliser though - that makes them rough as!

emma.jean said...

The lanolin does make your hands soft... but lots of tiny little burrs hurt your hands! One place we were on had heaps of burrs called Devil's Claw and that stuff was a bugger!

Kelley said...

Wow, you really are living on a farm! I know that sounds stupid, cause I know that you do, but reading that made me actually realise that you do! LMAO. So take it from me, you really are still citified :)
You country hick.

Love your fellow country hick that lives in 'town'

lightening said...

Ooh yeah Emma - those burrs aren't so nice. I know when DH was shearing on other properties he'd get all scratches and cuts over his arms at some places. I only noticed one fleece with burrs in it today so obviously we don't have so much trouble with that here.

Oh Kelley you do make me laugh - I love it. In all honesty, I still can hardly believe it myself. And I'm kinda glad that I still come across as "citified". I did grow up in the city (with all my high school years in Melbourne) so perhaps I'm still somewhat refined. LOL. Don't tell my SIL's I said that - they wouldn't take too kindly to me saying people raised on a farm are "country hicks" even if it was in a roundabout way. LOL. One of them is now VERY citified. :-)

Precious_1 said...

lol @ your post! you can take the girl out of the city............

;)

Lisa said...

I feel the same way about marrying a farmer!! Luckily there's not too many hanging around the suburbs of Melbourne, so I doubt it'll ever be a problem.
It's funny though.... the things we say we'll never do often end up happening!

lightening said...

Guess what Lisa - I was living in the suburbs of Melbourne when I decided I didn't want to marry a farmer! LOL. Seriously!!! Although, I wasn't actually living there when I did meet my husband.

Lisa said...

Now that's a worry. Any guy chewing on a straw and wearing a hat with corks dangling from it will definitely get short shrift from me!!!
Umm... isn't that what farmers are supposed to wear, or is that a bit too Banjo Patterson??? :)

lightening said...

LOL - I think you've gotten yourself too absorbed in the world of drama Lisa! :-) I'm yet to meet a farmer with corks hanging off his hat OR straw hanging out of his mouth.

Look out though - if you spot one wearing a blue singlet, you might be a goner! ;-)